Dane Skelton

    Dane Skelton is the Pastor of Faith Community Church and the author of Jungle Flight: Spiritual Adventures at the Ends of the Earth, a book of true stories from the ministry of JAARS (formerly Jungle Aviation and Radio Service). His second book, Papua Pilot: Flying the Bible to the Last Lost Peoples, co-authored with the late Paul Westlund, is now available on Amazon.com and Christianbook.com.
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    • Aug27Thu

      TOP TEN MENTAL HEALTH TIPS

      August 27, 2020

      In 2007-2009, my middle daughter, Emarie, passed through a time of deep testing. By God’s grace, she came through with her life and faith intact. She now works as an architect and Jiu Jitsu instructor in Billings, Montana. As I am at a conference this week, I thought you would appreciate her insights. 

      1) Find the balance between a healthy amount of time to reflect and too much introspection. Do you never slow down long enough to hear the silence? Or do you tie yourself in knots over-thinking? Develop habits that help you strike a middle-ground and pay attention to how you're doing every now and then.

      2) Journal often. It will help you do step one.

      3) Take care of your body. Drink water, sleep, eat your veggies! Move yourself!  I know you know how, but are you DOING it? It might take discipline and accountability to develop healthy habits, but you'll never get there if you don't go for it. Your brain feels better when you feel better.

      4) Talk to people you trust regularly. If you can't come up with 1-3 people you're close enough to do this regularly, consider a counselor. Professional talk therapists are better for preventative maintenance than crisis management; they're objective, they don't have to be your best friend, and they won't be part of your life forever.

      5) Do something productive. Change the oil. Clean the house. Mow the lawn. Savor the accomplishment of a small job well done.

      6) Cry. Everybody does, and there are things in life that merit it. If you can't grieve, you can't heal. In retrospect, I find it interesting that my deep-dive into depression involved no tears. I wouldn't let myself cry, and for a long time, I didn't heal. The frequency of a need to cry varies from person to person and across the seasons of life, but it's safe to say that you're overdue if you can't remember the last time. I keep a playlist of sad instrumental music, and when I'm feeling down, I turn it up and sit in the feeling until I figure out why. Usually, it merits a good cry. 

      7) Sing. I learned this from my younger sister, and it works! When her bedroom door slammed, and the soundtrack to Sweeney Todd started at full volume, there was no doubt she was upset. There's music to suit most any feeling; head out in the car alone, turn it up, and sing along. 

      8) Get straight with your creator. If you feel like you're bent double under the weight of something you can't even see, go to the one who accepts burdens. Go screaming, go fighting, go doubting, but go. 

      9) Worship. Once you know who God is glory in it. Meditate on it. Sing about it. If you've never done #8, this may seem silly, but participating in worship has never failed to change my day regardless of my mental/emotional state, attitude, energy level, or even intention. 

      10) Put yourself on a brain diet. I'm not talking about food. Pay attention to the information, images, and implied messages you are consuming, especially through social media and entertainment. You KNOW the stuff that's junk-brain-food. Junk-brain-food is just like junk food-food, it tastes good, at least for a moment. It strokes your ego, suits your fantasies, and captivates your attention. Stop taking it in. It may seem harmless, but it's poison for your brain. Unplug entirely if you have to. 

      For example, I like country music (not all of it, but, you know, more than 50%); however, I won't listen to some THEMES of country music. The feelings/attitudes those songs generate aren't worth it. I also don't watch horror movies. I know they're dumb, I don't believe any of it is real, and I know many of them are funny, silly, suspenseful, thrilling, or well-written. But I don't watch any of them because I find them disturbing and unenjoyable. Further, I think that if I liked a horror movie, I would like it the same way I like the third piece of chocolate cake, more in the having than the actual eating and not at all once it's finished. It's junk-brain-food, and my mental health is better without it.

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